Author Archives: vannettachapman

About vannettachapman

Vannetta Chapman writes inspirational fiction full of grace. She has published over one hundred articles in Christian family magazines, receiving more than two dozen awards from Romance Writers of America chapter groups. She discovered her love for the Amish while researching her grandfather’s birthplace of Albion, Pennsylvania. Her novel, Falling to Pieces, was a 2012 ACFW Carol Award finalist. A Promise for Miriam earned a spot on the June 2012 Christian Retailing Top Ten Fiction list. Chapman was a teacher for 15 years and currently writes full time. She lives in the Texas hill country with her husband. For more information, visit her at www.VannettaChapman.com

Summertime

Amish facts/history, Amish view Comments: 19

DSCN6526It’s here! The dog days of summer … or is it “dog daze.” Regardless, it feels like we’re melting in the south. So I thought I’d do a blog on how the Amish survive summer because as you know, they do not have air-conditioning.

  1. Most Amish homes are specifically designed so that they will catch a cross breeze. They have high ceilings and tall windows, which also helps.
  2. An Amish home and yard have many tall shade trees. In most Englisch subdivisions, a developer will go in and level the trees because “it’s not worth it to save them.” The houses go up and landscape is planted. Amish homes depend on the shade from mature trees to keep their house cool, so when they’re building – they plan around the trees.
  3. As you know, the Amish dress modestly–which you would think would be very hot. I’m reminded of my dad saying that he was cooler in a cotton long sleeved shirt than in a sleeveless one. Seems counter-intuitive, but I’ve also seen gardeners working in long sleeve shirts. I think the key is that the fabric needs to be breathable.
  4. Another saying from my dad was that “lightbulbs give off 98% heat and 2% light.” He might have been teasing in order to convince me to turn off lights when I left a room, or he might have been telling the truth. Regardless, the Amish don’t have many of the things in their homes that create heat – lights, appliances, etc.
  5. The women and children work outside early in the morning and late in the afternoon when it is cooler. That may seem obvious but occasionally I find myself dragging the trash to the curb at 11 in the morning, when it feels like I’m crossing White Sands New Mexico to get to the street.
  6. The Amish choose northern locations to live. There’s one small community in Texas, and to my knowledge there are none in New Mexico or Arizona. Not only is it uncomfortable to live in these locations during the hot summer months, but it’s nearly impossible to irrigate without some form of power.

I think that one reason the heat doesn’t bother the Amish as much as it does me or you is simply that they haven’t become accustomed to air-conditioning. I grew up without a/c in my home. My husband didn’t have it in his school. We survived and surprisingly we have good memories of those times. So much of life is making the best of what you have.

Comment below with how you combat the heat of summer, and I’ll draw one winner to receive my latest release. Our winner from the last post was Erika.

Blessings,

V

Announcements for this week:

  • Giveaway. My new Rafflecopter giveaway is live, and it includes two autographed copies of my upcoming release – one for you and one to share with a friend. Check my webpage for details.
  • VC Reader’s Boutique is now open. You can purchase autographed paperback books as well as handmade items to go along with the books. Click here to browse my items and remember that I add new items several times a week.
  • The repackaged edition of Material Witness releases July 10th and Love Inspired should start shipping paperback copies A Widow’s Hope on July 17th (ebook available 8-1). You can preorder in all the normal places.

Speaking Gigs

Author life Comments: 12

2018-05-15 18.04.18Last week I had the fun, fun experience of speaking at the Willard Public Library in Battle Creek, MI. I had an awesome time! My talk was titled, “Today’s Amish–Fact vs Fiction.” I love that subject.

It’s not that I’m an expert on the Amish, but I have met a few, and I can count a few as friends which I feel very fortunate about. As an author, it’s been awesome to travel to different Amish communities and see how they live, how they Continue reading

A Widow’s Hope

Amish fiction, Love Inspired Books Comments: 25

I9781335509642‘m so happy to share with you the cover of my first Harlequin/Love Inspired book. Isn’t it beautiful?

And here’s the back cover blurb:

His scars are visible.
Hers are hidden…
An
Indiana Amish Brides match

After tragedy claimed her husband’s life and her son’s ability to walk, Hannah King doesn’t want a new man. She has her family, a home and mounting debts. Scarred Amish bachelor Jacob Schrock offers Hannah the job she desperately needs. But while Hannah helps Jacob resolve his accounting issues, can she and her little boy also heal his wounded heart?

Continue reading

Monte Vista, Colorado

Amish facts/history, Amish fiction Comments: 25

This week I wanted to share with you pictures from the Amish community in Monte Vista, Colorado. If you’re receiving this blog in your email box, you might need to click on the link in order for the photographs to show. Who the Bishop Knows, the last of my novels set in Monte Vista, officially released on March 6, and I’m so pleased at the response. Thank you to everyone who Continue reading

Pick a Memory

Christian fiction, Christmas stories, giveaway Comments: 19

It seems that during the holiday season, more than any other time of year, our thoughts turn to special memories. That’s probably completely normal. It’s also probably normal for many of those memories to be happy and a few to be sad. It’s important for us to remember the people who had such an influence on us, who are a big part of who we turned out to be.piano 001

I love to look back over pictures of Christmas as a child, the houses where we used to live, Continue reading